Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine

William Funk Lab

Targeted Adductomics in DBS

Adduct panels can be quantified in DBS samples using as little as a single 3.2 mm punch of blood.

While unbiased approaches (i.e., omics strategies) are required to identify yet unknown biomarkers, high-throughput targeted methods are needed for quantifying candidate biomarkers in population-based epidemiological studies. The collection of plasma or serum via venipuncture is the current clinical standard, but logistical constraints associated with the collection of blood in non-clinical settings have been a significant impediment to including biomarkers in epidemiological research, especially in studies involving infants and children. DBS sampling provides a simple and minimally-invasive alternative to venipuncture that bridges this gap. In our lab we are currently developing and validating a highly sensitive multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) approach for quantifying panels of targeted adducts in DBS samples—which we refer to as the Multiple Adduct Panel (MAP) assay. Newborn DBS are especially well suited for adductomic experiments because adducts reflect an integration of exposures over weeks to months and therefore permit direct assessment of chemical exposures occurring during fetal development prior to birth that are otherwise go undetected. Current projects in our lab are focused on investigating associations between prenatal exposures and childhood asthma, obesity, and birth defects.

Adduct panels can be quantified in DBS samples using as little as a single 3.2 mm punch of blood.